Blog » ‘Accessibility in General’ Category

Reflective Parking Signs

Reflectorized Parking Signs – Exactly What is That?

Posted on July 9th, 2018

One of the items that did not seem entirely clear to me was reflective or reflectorized signs for parking, and how do you recognize them, vs glossy or matt signs. At one point I looked for small dots in the signs but many of them seem to be faded with no added benefit that I could discern. And recently I have been seeing the signs with vertical type prism bands. So what is required, what is the difference, and what are we looking for?

service animals and accessiblity

Companion Animals, Service Animals, and Access

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Many times issues come up regarding the presence of animals in public spaces and places of public accommodation. Most building/business owners (hopefully) know enough to allow the service animal in and that they can not ask a person with an animal what their disability is. But the question is – is the animal really a service animal – how can they tell, and which animals are they required to allow to enter the premises?

Path of Travel Considerations – for the Deaf Community & Others

Posted on September 8th, 2016

  Janis Kent, Architect, FAIA, CASp © September, 2016 One of the things we learn as designers and architects is how to organize, design, and incorporate way-finding thru axis and focal points. We learn about the more formal architecture with its linear and direct arrangements of space versus the informal with its cluster arrangements and less direct connections. […]

The Doorbell – Transient Lodging & Dwelling Units

Posted on July 21st, 2016

  Janis Kent, Architect, FAIA, CASp © July, 2016 Doorbells have a variety of requirements with the implementation of the 2010 ADA Standards. This would be within communication feature units both for transient lodging guest rooms as well as for dwelling units. These features are for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, and […]

Tolerances – Just how tolerant should you be?

Posted on January 11th, 2016

Acceptable tolerances are one of the major questions for built projects. No matter how carefully we delineate drawings or how well facilities are built, there always seems to be something that comes up that is not per plan or design. So after it is built, the question often is, a tolerance of ¼” or a tenth of a percent, for instance, is it acceptable? The answer is, of course – it depends.

Holidays And Accessibility

Posted on December 15th, 2013

Janis Kent, Architect, CASp © December, 2013 No matter what the holidays are, decorations are part of the celebration. So, since the decorations are temporary, I do not need to worry about access, correct? The answer to that question is no. One needs to be very careful not to block off access whether it is […]

Working Out of Home & Accessibility

Posted on June 7th, 2013

With the change in economy over recent years, more and more people are working out of home. It saves on expense, it saves on commuting time, and it allows you to work around the clock which has both its advantages and disadvantages. The question that should come up, but maybe doesn’t is, ‘Do I need […]

Lighting – Let the Sun In!

Posted on March 5th, 2013

We have heard so much about sun light not being good for us that we have missed the impact of natural light, in particular narrow spectrum blue light, and what it can do for our health and even well-being. We have also become energy efficient with lower artificial lighting levels inside that could adversely affect […]

Queueing

Posted on January 25th, 2012

You are expecting crowds to line up due to a sale, so you get out the speed rails and place them on the sidewalk to better organize people while waiting to get in. Rather than have the line as a single queue you arrange it to have several switchbacks. You measured it off and are […]

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