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Tolerances – Just how tolerant should you be?

Posted on January 11th, 2016

Acceptable tolerances are one of the major questions for built projects. No matter how carefully we delineate drawings or how well facilities are built, there always seems to be something that comes up that is not per plan or design. So after it is built, the question often is, a tolerance of ¼” or a tenth of a percent, for instance, is it acceptable? The answer is, of course – it depends.

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Clear Floor Spaces – Are they Really Clear?

Posted on December 5th, 2015

There are certain things in Access that at first and even second glance, appear to be clear. But many of the simple things are not as intuitive as you might imagine, particularly if you are not a wheelchair user. Clear floor spaces, for instance.

What is Not Transient Lodging – Alternatives & Access

Posted on September 14th, 2015

Aside from hotels, motels, and inns there are other types of vacation rentals that people use. Some fall under the definition of bed and breakfasts while others are considered short-term private rentals where people rent out their homes, or rooms within their homes whether thru an agent or thru online companies such as Airbnb.

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College Housing – Dormitories, Residence Halls, and Apartments – What to comply with?

Posted on August 12th, 2015

With the 2010 ADA Standards, college housing, if operated by or on behalf of a place of education, is considered transient lodging even though the period of stay is over 30 days. What this means is, it is required to comply with the ADA Standards, and in California, Section 11B as well.

Accessible Routes and Othe Pedestrian Ways

Accessible Routes and Other Pedestrian Ways

Posted on July 20th, 2015

Over the years people use various terminology referring to areas where pedestrian move – circulation path, accessible route, path of travel, and accessible means of egress. But the question is, are all of these terms inter-changeable or do they have some nuance of difference in their meaning? The answer is, they do overlap each other, but there is indeed differences between each of the terms. It would be good to understand the differences since the ADA Standards has further requirements for each of these categories and limits some of what we can do within each.

Which Code or Regulation Applies During the Course of a Project?

Posted on June 8th, 2015

Generally when we design a project, we know what codes and regulations apply. But what happens if the project was shelved for a while and suddenly comes alive? Or for that matter what happens if the project is under construction during the transition from the 1991 ADA to the 2010 ADA and it is an ADA requirement that was not previously regulated.

Restaurant, Bar, Banquet, Desk, and Cafeteria Seating – How much space do we need?

Posted on May 19th, 2015

When we do layouts of tables and seating, the question comes up – how much space between the tables and aisles are we going to need? We know we are required to have 5% of the seating accessible and dispersed within the area, but there is nothing specific on spacing other than that the tables are accessible and require a specific amount of clear floor space and the aisles require a specific width. So, we need to put this information together.

ADA Requirements for Kitchen Storage

Posted on April 13th, 2015

So what do we need to know about access for kitchen storage? Since we are talking about ADA it would pertain to kitchens that are new or altered in employee lounges/break rooms, and new or altered kitchenettes or kitchens in transient lodging whether in the guest room or in a common space. It would also apply to kitchens in multi-family residences that are owned, built, or operated on behalf of a public agency both in the common space and in the mobility feature dwelling units.

Truncated Domes — To Use or Not To Use?

Posted on March 9th, 2015

Truncated domes, a form of detectable warnings, have been around for a while. It is one of those items which is not a great solution but there does not appear to be anything comparable. It is meant for people with a visual impairment to determine the boundary between a sidewalk and a street. It has been used to warn of hazards along a circulation path where there is no curb, although it can cause a problem for people with other types of disabilities and can even create a trip hazard for those who are able-bodied. Also, in new construction, there has been a trend to eliminate curbs so we have even a less of a separation between vehicles and pedestrians.

Accessibility Expert Janis Kent elected to AIA’s Prestigious College of Fellows

Posted on February 4th, 2015

Long Beach, California – February 2, 2015 – The 2015 Jury of Fellows from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has elected Janis Kent to its esteemed College of Fellows. Ms Kent will be elevated at the Investiture Ceremony at the Ebenezer Baptist Church this May during the 2015 National AIA Convention in Atlanta, Georgia. […]