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counters and work surfaces accessibility

Counters and Work Surfaces for Sales/Service and Dining/Bar — What Is Required?

Posted on July 23rd, 2019

Discussion has come up of what is allowed or required for a bar or dining surface and how does this differ from a sales or service counter. Many times these two requirements are confused with each other. Some of the main questions are, what is required if there is a split-height counter and what about the required clear floor space.

parking accessibility

The Van Accessible Parking Space – What Does It Need?

Posted on May 29th, 2019

The technical requirements for parking are straight-forward, yet according to annual statistics provided by the California Commission on Disability Access (CCDA), items related to parking make up 5 of the top 10 accessibility related lawsuits in the state.

what makes a closet accessible?

Closet Space – What Is Required for Access?

Posted on April 9th, 2019

Closet space, whether common shared storage for employees, or within mobility feature guest rooms in hotels, student housing, or public dwelling units, needs to be accessible under the ADA.

Social Services ADA requirements

Social Service Center Establishments – What Are They?

Posted on March 20th, 2019

I have received a number of questions on how to treat multi-family residential facilities that also have offices and other services, and whether these are considered multi-use facilities. And of course the answer is – it depends.

Valet & Passenger Loading Zones

Valet & Passenger Loading Zones – What do I Need to Provide?

Posted on February 20th, 2019

Recently, it has come to my attention that there is some confusion on passenger loading zones and what are the requirements. It is also difficult to determine if the requirements are misunderstood based on drawing review, since on-grade markings are shown. It is just that they are incorrectly placed in the pull-up space. 

Access in the built environment - who is it for?

Access — Who is it for?

Posted on January 25th, 2019

Time and again, I find that there is often confusion as to what Access means and who it is for. There is this overlying presumption that it is mostly for people who use wheelchairs. There are many types of disabilities. The question is – what are we doing and for who is it for.

Reflective Parking Signs

Reflectorized Parking Signs – Exactly What is That?

Posted on July 9th, 2018

One of the items that did not seem entirely clear to me was reflective or reflectorized signs for parking, and how do you recognize them, vs glossy or matt signs. At one point I looked for small dots in the signs but many of them seem to be faded with no added benefit that I could discern. And recently I have been seeing the signs with vertical type prism bands. So what is required, what is the difference, and what are we looking for?

service animals and accessiblity

Companion Animals, Service Animals, and Access

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Many times issues come up regarding the presence of animals in public spaces and places of public accommodation. Most building/business owners (hopefully) know enough to allow the service animal in and that they can not ask a person with an animal what their disability is. But the question is – is the animal really a service animal – how can they tell, and which animals are they required to allow to enter the premises?

kitchen design considerations for aging in place

Kitchen Design Considerations for Aging in Place

Posted on February 28th, 2018

When remodeling a kitchen, what are some issues you might consider? We generally think of the appliances and locations, and then the countertop material and color. But there are additional items to consider if this is your forever home or if this is the one and only kitchen remodel you are thinking to do. So what are some issues to consider so the kitchen is useful as you age along with your house?

What is a Certified Access Specialist (CASp)? Interview of Janis Kent in Connection Magazine

Posted on February 9th, 2018

I have been asked many times, what is a CASp (Certified Access Specialist program) and why is this program necessary. What I have found over the years is that Accessibility has become so complex, not only in the scoping and technical aspects but also which regulations apply. Typically this has been in the realm of architects, but determining which regulations and how to apply them many times depends upon money sourcing and whether it is a program of a public entity or a federal agency.